PaulaBullock Veterinarian
Paula Bullock Veterinarian

Paula Bullock Veterinarian Showcases Advocacy Work of AVMA

Expert Paula Bullock veterinarian offers a closer look at the American Veterinary Medical Association and its crucial advocacy work.

The nonprofit American Veterinary Medical Association—or AVMA—was founded in 1863. Today, more than 150 years on, it continues to represent U.S. veterinarians employed in private and corporate practice, academia, industry, government, and uniformed services. Qualified for almost three decades, Paula Bullock veterinarian provides a closer look at the association and its advocacy efforts across the United States, from working with policymakers in all branches of the government to elevating the voices of individual members.

Paula Bullock Veterinarian
Paula Bullock Veterinarian

“The American Veterinary Medical Association represents the interests of veterinarians via strategically targeted advocacy in the House of Representatives and the Senate, with regulatory agencies, and before the courts,” explains Paula Bullock veterinarian.

At individual state levels, the AVMA also serves as a trusted partner to further complement the advocacy work of regional veterinary medical associations, according to Paula Bullock veterinarian. “Powered by the strength of its membership, the association is able to put ideas into action,” Bullock reveals, “around issues important to veterinarians, their teams, and their clients and animal patients.”

The American Veterinary Medical Association’s advocacy efforts are, the organization says, currently focused on education and student debt, access to veterinary care, and scope of practice among a wealth of other issues. Other areas routinely addressed by the AVMA’s crucial advocacy work, Paula Bullock veterinarian goes on to point out, include, but are not limited to, economics, small business, animal welfare, veterinary research, and public health.

The AVMA is currently the only national veterinary organization working with policymakers in all branches of the government. Its position as such, the association says, makes it uniquely able to advocate for the strengthening of every aspect of the veterinary profession, ensuring that viewpoints across the board—including the voices of its individual members—are heard.

Representing more than 95,000 members, the American Veterinary Medical Association is, Paula Bullock veterinarian reports, by far the nation’s leading advocate for the profession. Now in practice for close to 30 years, Paula graduated from North Carolina State University in 1993.

The American Veterinary Medical Association’s overall aim, Paula Bullock veterinarian says, is to advance the shared interests, values, and goals of association members by, for example, developing positions on key issues, providing educational accreditation and certification programs, and delivering timely and relevant products and services that enhance their opportunities for success.

Elsewhere, the American Veterinary Medical Association is, in addition to its advocacy and development work, the name behind the best-in-class AVMA Convention, the Veterinary Leadership

Paula Bullock Veterinarian

Conference—drawing veterinarians from across the U.S. to help develop leaders for the profession—and a number of other popular summits and symposiums on subjects including animal welfare, economics, and public policy, according to Paula Bullock veterinarian.

“A diverse and passionate group of professionals, the American Veterinary Medical Association also educates the public on the importance of the work that veterinarians do,” adds Paula Bullock veterinarian in closing, “to advance both animal and human health.”

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